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STORIES FROM LUKE

We have been reading from Luke’s gospel on Sunday mornings. Many of us love Luke because of his telling of the Christmas story and he is the one who tells the popular parables of the Good Samaritan and The Prodigal Son. 


On this page, you will find scripture that is unique to the Gospel of Luke as well as the favorite stories from Luke that staff members love. 


We hope you enjoy reading through Luke!

THE STORIES WE LOVE IN LUKE

mARY & MARTHA - 

JANE SANDERS

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

luke 10:38-42

I used to be puzzled with the story of Mary and Martha Knowing that someone has to do the work. However, I have come to understand the point of the passage is about making Jesus and His word our first priority. 


Martha, like many of us became anxious over impressing her guest.  I find my life resembling Marha many times and I have to remind myself not to let my busy life of service distract me from spending time with Jesus. When we give Jesus the attention he deserves, he empowers us to serve others. 

The Prodigal son - 

rev. matt hall

ASSOCIATE PASTOR

luke 15:11-32

This was the first passage I ever preached from at a United Methodist Church in Pearisburg, Va. (also known as Pastor Sarah’s home town). It is almost too easy to pick this passage as my favorite in the gospel of Luke. At the point in which I spoke on this passage for the first time I saw myself as the Prodigal Son. I wasn’t too far removed from the stings of active addiction. Someone else even had to drive me for a number of reasons: one being to make sure I actually showed up and didn’t chicken out; and two, I am not even sure if I had a driving privileges at that point. I am not sure how the sermon was received; I don’t remember looking up once.


(Read more from Matt HERE)


BUILDING BIGGER BARNS - 

CHRIS LEE

CONTEMPORARY WORSHIP LEADER

luke 12:13-21

There is a new area of study in psychology and sociology called the “Social Comparison Theory” or “Obsessive Comparison Disorder.” This can be defined as our compulsion to constantly compare ourselves with others, producing unwanted thoughts and feelings that drive us to depression, consumption, anxiety and

all-around joyous discontent. This plaque of comparison has become so widespread that there are scientists and sociologist spending time trying to find cures for our new paths of dissatisfaction with our lives.  


 (Read more from Chris HERE)


Repentance of zacchaeus - terry wilson

director of music

luke 19:1-10

I think Zacchaeus' encounter with Christ is deeper than just his curiosity.  it is apparent that Zacchaeus is  searching for something more meaningful in his life.  Something that he cannot find as chief of publicans.


The result of his encounter with Christ is life changing. His sins are forgiven.  He accepts salvation that Christ offers.  He will now live for the Son of God. 


Is this not a story about and for all of us?


Rich man and lazarus - 

rev. sarah slack

luke 16:19-31

Every single day the rich man went outside, he encountered Lazarus. Yet not once did he acknowledge the needs of the poor, broken human at his gate.  We often operate like the rich man, going about our business without noticing or acknowledging needs right at our feet.

 

A couple of years ago, I heard Rev. Dr. Tom Long preach on this passage.  He said, “Sometimes a window opens in life and there is the kingdom, right there.  God is acting in the world to bless and redeem the world and we’re invited to be a part of it.  


Sometimes we do, sometimes we don’t.  But the window opens, then closes, and it’s too late.”  Every day the rich man passed by Lazarus and the Kingdom of God was opened for a moment to provide a blessing to both men…yet it never happened because the one wasn’t open to the possibility that there was something else he could need in life: a blessing.

 

May God open our eyes and our hearts to God’s Kingdom in our midst. 

martha and mary -

denise johns

dir. of 1st kids ministries

luke 10: 38-42

I love the story of Martha and Mary because I can totally relate to the women that I identify with and because Jesus offers me another way to BE. 


HONOR AT THE TABLE

LUKE 14: 7-14  -

REV. CATHERINE NANCE

___

Anytime I read Luke 14:7-14, I remember the first ‘fancy dinner’ I went to where there were place cards. I sat down with my friend at a table and then was told by one of the hosts, no, you can’t sit just anywhere, you have to find your name. I was in high school and had never even heard of ‘place cards.’


There was that awkward milling around looking for my name. seeing other names and wondering why

so-and-so was sitting next to

what’s-her-name? WHERE is my name? And then, after you find your name, who is on my right and left? Am I sitting across from someone I know? Why was I placed here?


Seating arrangements are awkward. When Jesus offered this teaching, he may have made it more awkward for some and a relief for others. 


What do you think?

THE WOMAN WHO WASHES JESUS' FEET WITH HER TEARS

luke 7:36-50  

nATHAN IRWIN,

DIRECTOR OF 1ST YOUTH

This story is a contrast in two ways to approach Christ.  Simon the Pharisee hosts Jesus, but the woman widely regarded as a sinner is the one who approaches Jesus with love, thankfulness, and devotion and in doing so, her sins are forgiven. 

the parable of the widow and the unjust judge

luke 18: 1-8

-

SUSAN DAVES,

ASSISTANT DIR. OF MUSIC

The parable of the unjust judge and the persistent widow is a reminder to us that God is always willing to listen and not only willing, but wanting us to call upon Him. 


The judge who admitted he feared, neither God, nor man, was finally “worn out” by the widow’s persistence. 


The parable reminds us that God, unlike the judge, does not have to be worn down. He loves those who cry out to him day and night. He wants justice. He is eager for us to come to him. He wants to communicate with us. 


We are to be praying constantly and to remain persistent until the answer comes.

SCRIPTURE UNIQUE TO LUKE

PARABLES

The Good Samaritan (10: 29-37)

The Importunate Friend (11:5-8)

The Rich Man who built bigger barns (12:16-21)

The Fig Tree (13:6-9) -- transformation of fig tree episode in Mark and Matthew.

The Prodigal Son (15:11-32)

The Crafty Steward (16:1-9)

The Rich Man and Lazarus (16:19-31)

The Unscrupulous Judge (18:1-8)

The Publican and the Sinner (18:9-14)


TEACHINGS

Warning about greed (12: 13-15)

Suffering not linked to guilt (13:1-5)

Places of honor at table (14:7-14)

Costs of discipleship (14: 25-35)

Necessity of a purse and a sword

(22:35-38)


NARRATIVE EPISODES

Entire infancy narrative: (Luke 1 & 2)

      birth of John the Baptist

      (Zachariah & Elizabeth)

       birth of Jesus (Bethlehem & shepherds )

       presentation in temple (Anna & Simeon)

       encounter in temple with teachers of the         Law


Miraculous draft of fish (5:1-11)

Widow's son at Nain (7:11-17)

Woman who bathes Jesus' feet with tears (7:36-50)

The women who accompany Jesus (8:2-3)

Sending of the seventy-two (10:1-2)

Martha and Mary (10:38-42)

Healing of a crippled woman on the Sabbath (13:10-13)

Healing of a man with dropsy on the Sabbath (14:1-6)

The Samaritan leper (17:11-19)


Repentance of Zacchaeus (19:1-10)

Jesus weeps over Jerusalem (19:41-44)

Jesus before Herod (23:6-16)

Meeting with "daughters of Jerusalem" (23:26-32)

The good and bad thieves (23-39-43)

Appearance on the road to Emmaus

(24:13-35)